orchids and epiphytes

I have resisted buying orchids for years now. It seems like they would be (another) hard-to-quit addiction.

But I gave in recently and purchased a beautiful white Phalaenopsis and after reading all the specific instructions about how to raise them and keep them blooming…whew! I think one orchid baby is enough for me to handle. I have a great deal of respect for people who collect them. They make quite an impressive display all grouped together.

I haven’t found the exact sweet spot for my orchid yet, I just know I would like for it to hang like it does in its natural habitat, rather than be stalked upright; therefore, I need to find a shelf or high place in the sun. We’ll get there eventually.

Orchids are epiphytes meaning they derive their moisture and nutrients from the air, rain, water or from debris accumulating around them. They get nutrients from their roots as well but unlike some plants, epiphytes also get nourishment through their leaves.

I already use Orchid Plant Food Mist on some of my other epiphytes so I was ready to go on supplemental orchid nourishment.

Here are some other common houseplant epiphytes that I use orchid spray on a couple of times a week:

All of my hoyas…

My Pilea (Chinese Money Plant) … which is getting ready to undergo a major propagation surgery

Syngoniums (Arrowhead plant) are all epiphytes

Jade plants…

Philodendrons… give them a quick spray

Even Tillandsia air plants!

Other common houseplants you could use the spray on would be cactus, bromeliads, staghorn ferns, and household ferns.

This orchid spray bottle is getting a big workout! I spray the plants a couple of times a week and they seem to be perfectly happy with the extra bit of love.

Something we alllll could use lately, right??

If you’re curious about what other plants are epiphytes, try googling a list to see if any of your plant roomies are on it. I bet they’d like a fresh spray of nutrient love too!

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